Monday, November 20, 2017

Marvel-ous Monday: "The Widow and the Militants!" by Friedrich, Colan, and Everett

Greetings, Groove-ophiles! It's the next part of Gary Friedrich's militant mini-epic starring the Black Widow, and now he's joined by the most exquisite art team of Gene Colan and Bill Everett. Colan's storytelling is superbly cinematic and Everett's inks are so slick and moody that you can still enjoy the story even though you can see the "twist" of "The Mob's" involvement in the unrest that's got our Young Militants taking action from a few city blocks away. Still, it's an involving and exciting story--what more can we ask for? (Cameos of J. Jonah Jameson and Peter Parker, you say? See page 2, baby!) Here's "The Widow and the Militants!" from Amazing Adventures #3 (August 1970)!
Cover art by John Buscema and John Verpoorten











Friday, November 17, 2017

Making a Splash: Neal Adams' Green Lantern/Green Arrow

All right, Groove-ophiles, it's time to look back on one of the most celebrated and influential series of comics' Groovy Age: Green Lantern/Green Arrow. Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams pretty much turned comicdom on its ear when it took two of DC's staid characters and used them to usher in DC's "relevant" era of comics. Green Lantern, DC's "cosmic cop," and Green Arrow, the former millionaire Batman rip-off who became the liberal everyman's mouthpiece after his fortune was stolen from him, touched on "today" issues like politics, the economy, overpopulation, the generation gap, sexism, racism, rioting, and drugs--all the while keeping the super-hero/sci-fi/fantasy edge handy. O'Neil's realistic dialogue coupled with Adams' realistic art turned GL's moribund mag into a critical darling, though it only delayed the mag's inevitable cancellation. While the styles may seem "dated" to today's readers, O'Neil/Adams' GL/GA is bound to be an influence on many of today's "socially conscious" creators. More than anything else, though, Neal Adams drew the living daylights out of GL/GA's adventures! With inkers like Dick Giordano, Berni Wrightson, and more, here's Neal doing his thing for issues 76-89 (February 1970-February 1972)!














Thursday, November 16, 2017

They Don't Make 'Em Like That Anymore (Or Do They?): The Creeps

Ya, know, Groove-ophiles, sometimes Ol' Groove has to wonder why he does what he does--and doesn't do. For example, The Creeps magazine has been around for going on three years, and while I've mentioned Rich Sala's genius revival of Warren's Creepy and Eerie, I've never done a full on post about 'em. Well, hang on, baby, and prepare to get...The Creeps!



If you love Black and White Wednesday here on the Diversions, you really want to get this mag! Rich Sala not only writes and edits, but he's also collected a small army of outstanding artists like Nik Poliwko, Jason Paulos, Russ Rainbolt, Mansyur Daman, Reno Maniquis, and several others whose styles don't ape but instead truly capture the feel of the classic EC-inspired styles of James Warren's original line-up of artists for his Creepy and Eerie mags. If that's not enough for you, then dig this: Sala has also managed to get art and stories from Warren alumni like Ken Kelly, Sanjulian, Rich Corben, Alex Nino, Pablo Marcos, Rich Buckler, Neal Adams, Frank Brunner, Ralph Reese, Jeff Easley, Alan Weiss, Val Mayerik, Bill Black, Nick Cuti, Don Glut, Roger McKenzie, T. Casey Brennan...I can keep going, but I'm sure you get the idea. Check out this random gallery of contents pages and splashes! If these don't turn you on, I don't know what will!














Oh, and as Ol' Groove has mentioned before, Sala even lets me write a terror-tale every now and again. My "Clownin' Around" was in ish #8, and I have another called "High Moon" that should appear in 2018.


So what are you waiting for, baby? You want comics that capture the Groovy Age vibe--and use honest-to-gosh Groovy Age creators, to boot? Then get thee to The Creeps' website (or to thine fave comics shop or Barnes and Noble) and get...THE CREEPS!


Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Black and White Wednesday: The Power of Pat Broderick

Hey, hey, hey, Groove-ophiles! One of the unsung heroes of the Groovy Age is one Mr. Pat Broderick. His cool, unique style made him one of Teen Groove's favorite artists. He did so many great comics, starting as an apprentice at Neal Adams and Dick Giordano's Continuity Studios and doing contents pages and filler images for DC's 100 page comics. He made a splash with the fledgling Atlas/Seaboard drawing the Dark Avenger back-up in Phoenix #3 (which you can read right here) and, of course, Planet of Vampires #1 (and yes, you can read that one here) and 2 (you guessed it! Right here). From there he went to Marvel and did a couple Marvel Premiere issues of Iron Fist, a variety of kung fu strips (in both Master of Kung Fu and Deadly Hands of Kung Fu), then finished out the 70s knocking us dead with his cosmic work on Captain Marvel and Micronauts. He'd go on to wow us even more throughout the 80s and 90s on mags like Fury of Firestorm, Legion of Super-Heroes, Detective Comics, Captain Atom, Doom 2099, and many more. So why is he an "unsung hero"? Because he's one of the many, still-vital, still uber-talented creators still going strong--but mostly ignored by fandom and the larger comics companies. It's a shame that he's not still a super-star, but Mr. Broderick just keeps on truckin', putting out awesome commissions and comics like his self-published Niburu (which you really should check out)! Meantime, dig these in-freakin'-credible Groovy Age masterpieces!




























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Note to "The Man": All images are presumed copyright by the respective copyright holders and are presented here as fair use under applicable laws, man! If you hold the copyright to a work I've posted and would like me to remove it, just drop me an e-mail and it's gone, baby, gone.

All other commentary and insanity copyright GroovyAge, Ltd.

As for the rest of ya, the purpose of this blog is to (re)introduce you to the great comics of the 1970s. If you like what you see, do what I do--go to a comics shop, bookstore, e-Bay or whatever and BUY YOUR OWN!